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The story:
    I went looking for a map of how intense the coronavirus is around the country right now. But to my surprise, I couldn’t find one that had active cases per capita and in an easily understandable graphic. It seemed to me that a map like that would be useful for people making personal health and travel decisions - and also how to receive people traveling here to Vermont (or to anywhere). So being a professional computer programmer, I decided to make one. 

What is an active case and how are they counted?

   Active cases are the confirmed new cases reported by a county over the past (14) days. 

How is this map different from other maps out there?

    Most maps provide "total" cases rather than "active" cases. Active cases are more useful for making personal health decisions and public policy. For example, if you just looked at New York's total cases, you might not want to go there. But the active cases paint quite a different picture. For example, between April and July, the active cases in New York have declined dramatically.

   Also, this map displays active confirmed cases per capita. This is another key difference. Having 1,000 active cases in Key West (population 25,000) represents a much higher risk of transmission than having 1,000 active cases in Chicago (population 2.7 million). That's over a 100x difference not being reflected in many other maps.

   Finally, this map shows information down to the county level rather than just the state level. It also provides more details (like state lines), more colors, greater differentiation at the low-end, greater differentiation at the high-end, video time lapse, etc.

What are the closest maps that you've found to these?

  https://accd.vermont.gov/covid-19/restart/cross-state-travel

  https://globalepidemics.org/key-metrics-for-covid-suppression/

  

From what data was this map derived?

   This map is a transformation of data provided by the Johns Hopkins Coronavirus Resource Center 

How accurate is the data you are using?

   We believe that Johns Hopkins has the most comprehensive COVID-19 database, but we make no claims as to the accuracy of that data. In fact, we know that infections are under-counted because not everyone who got sick received a test nor did a significant percent of people with mild or no symptoms. That said, this is the best data set that we can get our hands on.  

Can I share the content on this site?

  Feel free to link to this site or use it in your news program. But please note, this site’s images and videos are copyrighted. Please do not duplicate or distribute for commercial purposes - without express written consent.

What if I know of, or even make, a more feature rich site with this same information?
  If your site has active cases per capita mapped out, and it’s free of ads & cookies, I will definitely consider linking to it. I’m not here to corner the market - rather I saw a need and am attempting to fill it. If others want to help fill that same need, then I’m certainly open to collaboration and even deferring to a source with the information presented in a better way.  

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